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Faulty Towers

Stereo mix of 5.1 surround soundscape created for visual street art exhibition at Gallery 40, Brighton, feat. Cassettelord, ZeeZee22, Archi Ram, Funky Red Dog.

– Steve Verdin
guitar, bass, samples, arrangements

– Laila Hansen
guitar, keyboard, samples, arrangements

of the
Partial Facsimile Collective

Mixed and produced by
Laila Hansen at the Oriental Cave Studio.
Brighton. 2014.

Beolab 14 surround sound system sponsored by
Bang & Olufsen of Brighton & Hove.

Project brief:

In this art exhibition, titled ‘Faulty Towers’, a diverse group of artists and musicians have come together to investigate how art, music and other creative genres incorporate structures and systems that have direct parallels with architecture. Towers have become a re-occurring building type in virtually every major city around the world. These often begin life as shiny and glamorous icons but after a time, unforeseen constructional and planning defects sometimes render them unusable – they may even have to undergo major refurbishment or need to be completely demolished. Thus towers often represent both a celebration and disillusionment about mankind’s future. 

The creative works that are being displayed are a mixture of both serious and humorous pieces, that attempt to engage with the common underpinnings found in nature and the environment, with the structural, mathematical and proportioning systems of the man-made world. Some of the artists propose elegant and perhaps impossible new construction or sometimes deconstruction, whilst others combine ad-hoc marks, or hybrid and collaged shapes, which mimic natural generative and regenerative processes. In this exhibition each artist explores their own personal reaction to this theme, 

leaving the viewer to ponder their own, inevitably uncertain future.